What is MPEG DASH ? Is MPEG DASH going to change my life? When will Google, the ghost of Steve Jobs and Microsoft start a proxy war over MPEG DASH and VP9 ?

 

  1. What’s up with MPEG DASH? Is it another tech to pixel-blast my eyeballs with?
  2. How is MPEG DASH being promoted?
  3. Is MPEG DASH a standard?
  4. Another migration? Or is anything compatible with MPEG DASH?
  5. It it a streaming silver bullet that solves all our cross-compatibility issues magically?
  6. Does anyone care about any of this outside of the streaming media industry?
  7. What will happen to MPEG DASH when Google decides to destroy it with God like rage?
  8. What is DASHAVC-264?
  9. Why does the MPEG DASH “Promoters Group” think MPEG DASH is better then HLS, HDS IIS Smooth Streaming
  10. How does DASH compare to HDS, HLS, et. al., in terms of compression, file size to quality, etc?
  11. Who currently supports DASH playback?
  12. Are the big telcos and service providers like Akamai, Edgecast, Level 3, Internap, etc on board?
  13. Sold! Let’s drop everything and migrate for slightly higher quality, maybe, if the end user has the downstream pipe! Can I literally start another endless cycle of transcoding to DASH today?
  14. What is ‘DASH-IF’ and why are there already spin-off acronyms?

  1. Why is MPEG-DASH so important and why is it increasingly being talked about in industry circles?

    MPEG-DASH simplifies and converges the delivery of IP video, to provide a rich and enjoyable user experience, to help drive down costs and ultimately to enable a better content catalogue to be offered to consumers, because more revenues can be re-invested in content, rather than paying for operating overheads. It will help streamline and simplify workflows and enable operators and content providers to build sustainable business models to continue to deliver the services that consumers demand.

Back to top

  1. How does the technology compare to existing streaming solutions?

    MPEG-DASH builds on the already excellent adaptive streaming technologies deployed today. The MP4 File Format (based on the ISO Base Media File Format) enables common encryption to allow delivery of content to a wide range of devices with various DRM schemes. MPEG-DASH also allows multiple language versions of the same content to be delivered thus enlarging target audiences. Whether consuming traffic from a service provider’s own content offering, or using a new over-the-top service, video consumption to IP-enabled devices is driving up traffic on operators’ networks. Building out new capacity to cope with today’s demands and the predicted growth over the coming years is prohibitively expensive, yet consumers continue to expect higher quality IP video without a corresponding hike in broadband access charges.

    MPEG-DASH will help to overcome some of the challenges of other adaptive streaming formats and provides service providers with the confidence coming from embracing a truly global standard.

    What MPEG-DASH aims to do is simplify the delivery landscape and help realize the promise of adaptive streaming.

Back to top

  1. What is the status of MPEG-DASH standard?

    MPEG-DASH (ISO/IEC 23009-1) was published as an ISO in March 2012.

Back to top

  1. What is DASHAVC-264?

    DASHAVC-264 was developed by the DASH Industry Forum interoperability subgroup to provide recommended guidelines for deployment of MPEG-DASH. DASHAVC-264 recommends a specific subset of MPEG-DASH. This is important, since MPEG-DASH is a wide-ranging specification, and implementation and deployment of everything in MPEG-DASH would likely be too large of a task for more companies. DASHAVC-264 also recommends specific video and audio codecs and profiles (something which MPEG-DASH doesn’t cover), to ensure interoperability at this level. DASHAVC-264 is based on contributions of test vectors provided by DASH Industry Forum members, and thus all of the recommended guidelines within DASH264-AVC have been tested for interoperability within the DASH Industry Forum.

Back to top

  1. Can it solve some of the business issues around multi-screen?

    MPEG-DASH enables the delivery of content to all devices. One of the major challenges facing content and service providers is the fragmentation of devices. It is no longer enough to create a single version of a video asset for presentation on the household TV. Multiple viewing devices with differing screen sizes receive content over networks with capacities that vary over time; a Smartphone on a 3G mobile network requires a completely different asset than the 50” HDTV in the living room. MPEG-DASH reduces cost at every step of the chain from content preparation, hosting, caching to final delivery. MPEG-DASH, as an http adaptive streaming technology, promises to reduce complexity by allowing the receiving device to select which resolution and bitrate stream to view, and the ability to change the choice over time as network conditions demand. This will allow content providers to concentrate on generating a fixed number of choices for each asset, greatly simplifying their workflow. It will also allow business models to expand to cater for content even further down the “tail”. It will also allow delivery of content to homes that were previously out of reach commercially.

Back to top

  1. What kind of interest and/or traction is MPEG-DASH seeing from the non-vendor community?

    The DASH Promoters Group (DASH-PG) has been formed by several companies and organizations, who are working together to promote the adoption of MEG-DASH standard in the market –The goal of this group is to accelerate the deployment of MPEG-DASH across all applications: mobile, broadcast, Internet and of course enable interoperability between all MPEG-DASH content and connected devices to the highest extent possible. This is exactly what was missing in the legacy adaptive streaming protocols.

    Several consortia and organizations adopted or are considering adopting MPEG-DASH in their specifications. EBU is the first broadcast organization to join the DASH Promoters Group.

Back to top

  1. What are we likely to see in terms of deployment in 2013?

    While 2012 was the early adopters deployment development year, with real demonstrations of end to end systems, 2013 will be the year of broader commercial deployments with a broader range of devices, especially in the latter half of the year. Broad interoperable adoption of the MPEG DASH adaptive streaming protocols are likely to follow publication of based on publication of the first implementation guidelines, DASHAVC-264, now available at http://xxx.yyyy.zzz for public review before final release on March 31, 2013. With this movepublication, DASH will effectively grow beyond 2012’s early adopters and into more mainstream OTT and hybrid services. 2014 will be the mass deployment year of MPEG-DASH technology.

Back to top

  1. From a cost benefit perspective, why should I start with or move to DASH over another streaming technology such as HLS or Smooth Streaming?

    DASH’s common encryption will allow for multiservice and multidevice support along with efficiency of manifest management as well as the sizable advantages of a global standard. DASH, as a single new standard, will allow content producers to encode once then securely distribute their content to players universally, from mobile to OTT, as well as desktop via HTML5 or plug-ins. Today a content operator might publish content to three separate devices using three separate adaptive bit rate formats, Apple HLS, Smooth Streaming and Adobe HDS. This operator incurs the packaging, storage and delivery costs three times over. DASH, as a universal standard, allows the content operator to package, store and deliver content a single time, significantly reducing costs.

Back to top

  1. How does DASH compare to HLS, Smooth Streaming and other streaming technologies in terms of compression, container, player/client control, etc?

    In regards to data format, Microsoft Smooth Streaming and Adobe HDS content are similar to the DASH ISOBMFF Live Profile while Apple HLS content is similar to the DASH M2TS main profile. For more quantitative studies on the subject, see:

    S. Akhshabi, A.C. Begen, and C. Dovrolis, “An Experimental Evaluation of Rate-Adaptation Algorithms in Adaptive Streaming over HTTP,” Proc. ACM Multimedia Systems Conf., ACM Press, 2011 (http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~dovrolis/Papers/final-saamer-mmsys11.pdf)

    Christopher Müller, Stefan Lederer and Christian Timmerer, “An Evaluation of Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP in Vehicular Environments”, In Proceedings of the ACM Multimedia Systems Conference 2012 and the 4th ACM Workshop on Mobile Video, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, February 24, 2012 (http://www-itec.uni-klu.ac.at/bib/files/p37-mueller.pdf)

    And, for a more practical comparison:

    DASH: A Universal Standard for Streaming Video Content to Multiple Devices (http://www.harmonicinc.com/sites/default/files/20120830_DASH_Article_0.pdf)

Back to top

  1. As a content producer, will my current content and production content be compatible with DASH?

    Most of an operator’s existing content and production equipment will be compatible with DASH. To use the DASH protocol, an operator will have to upgrade existing servers with DASH streaming capability. A software upgrade of the packaging will be required of other existing technologies such as encoders. Client side upgrades would also be needed, where browsers such as Chrome and IE must be modified to support DASH. Basically, the transition to MPEG DASH is a software upgrade of currently deployed adaptive streaming technologies.

Back to top

  1. What devices currently support DASH playback?

    More to come on this soon.

Back to top

  1. How will the standard be used between different platform operators?

    More to come on this soon.

Back to top

  1. How will the DASH-IF enable interoperability and widespread use of DASH?

    The DASH-IF’s Interoperability Working Group is focused on the development and production of DASHAVC-264, an application profile that will outline the specifics, such as the codex, test vectors, software tools and syntaxes for transmitting over HTTP needed for interoperability.

Back to top

  1. Is it possible to deliver content using DASH right now?

    Several companies have already announced support for DASH in encoders and on servers, while several other notable companies, such as Microsoft, have announced plans to support DASH in the near future. 2013 should see broader adoption of MPEG DASH.

Back to top

5 karma points