August 15, 2014 7:10 am Tags: , , , , No Comments 0

By Will Hodge

Goooooood morning NoiseTrade! After such a heavy week of sadness, hurt, and ugliness going on all around us, I sincerely hope you are able to find (or steal) some quiet moments of repose and renewal this weekend. To aid in that endeavor, I’ve got a few musical recommendations for you to try out. First, we released another NoiseTrade EastSide Manor Session this week with Australia’s alt-folk outfit Boy & Bear. These talented Aussies crafted a wonderful 5-song live set that’s perfect for the closing weeks of summer. We’ve also got some amazing multi-cam videos of their performances, an interview, and some candid behind-the-scenes footage available on our YouTube channel as well. This week’s Weekend Wrap-Up foursome also contains some stellar releases that span the gamut from spunky pop punk to acoustic roots singalongs to humorous hip-hop to cinematic indie-folk. Who else is offering you inventive covers of The Ramones and Taylor Swift in the same batch of sonic suggestions? That’s NoiseTrade, baby!

The Dollyrots
“Da Doo Ron Ron/ I Wanna Be Sedated” (single)

If you’re looking for some amped-up pop punk with energetic female vocals and a sense of humor, then The Dollyrots have got you more than covered. Acting as a fantastic primer of the band’s sound and attitude, their playful mash-up cover of The Crystals 1963 smash “Da Doo Ron Ron” and The Ramones 1978 fan favorite “I Wanna Be Sedated” closes out their most recent album Barefoot and Pregnant. The tongue-in-cheekily titled record was released earlier this year and was named so because singer/bassist Kelly Ogden was pregnant during the recording of the album. If you dig this single and want to hear more, the band has Barefoot and Pregnant available on their website in swanky looking pink vinyl. They’ve also got a handful of other singles (including another great 60s cover of The Turtles “Happy Together”) available here on NoiseTrade.

Twin Forks
An Introduction to Twin Forks [EP]

When I first ran into Further Seems Forever on 1999 Deep Elm Records compilation An Ocean of Doubt, I was immediately arrested by the emotive timbre of Chris Carrabba’s vocals. Through the next few years, I eagerly followed his whisper-to-a-scream voice through his time with Further Seems Forever and into his creation of Dashboard Confessional. When I heard Carrabba debut his new band < strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Twin Forks at last year’s SXSW, I was so pleased to hear the same passion and fervor of his previous bands filtered through the country and folk influences of his childhood. < strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Twin Forks released their debut self-titled album this past February and they’ve been creating quite a buzz in roots music circles. This exclusive four-track sampler EP features two tracks from their debut – “Back to You” and “Kiss Me Darling” – as well as a previously unreleased song called “Good and Slow” and an infectious cover of Taylor Swift’s “Mean” that will not leave your head anytime soon.


While humor isn’t quite a foundational requirement for hip-hop lyricists, Phoenix-based rapper Foreknown might make you think it should be. Embodying the vacant (or previously non-existent) space between the societal consciousness of Common and the wit/intelligence mix of Weird Al, Foreknown quickly and effortlessly slides between making you really laugh and making you really think. Songs like “Quartermaster” and “#FootyPajamaPizzaDanceKaraokePartyGo!” contain some of the biggest punchlines and “Little Miss So & So” and “The Truth about Flight, Love, and BB Guns” contain some of the biggest pull-no-punches lines. Rarely before in hip-hop has humor been used so effectively to highlight deeper truths and differing perspectives. Ornithology is Foreknown’s debut album and I certainly hope it’s just the first in a long line of releases from this talented and engaging rapper.

Swear and Shake
Ain’t That Lovin’ [EP]

There’s this significant moment in “Like You Do” – the opening track to Swear and Shake’s new EP – where the bouncy bass, plunky piano, and vintage vocals give way to a slinky slide guitar and a huge singalong chorus. That moment contains everything you need to know about Swear and Shake’s individualized sonic identity. It’s cinematic, melodic, crystalline, and downright fun to experience. The other four songs on Ain’t That Lovin’ display the same enthralling elements and guarantee multiple spins through this all-too-short EP. The songs “Daggers” and “Good as Gone” convey life on the road, while “Wishful Thinking on Seagrass Shoal” and “Be Your Strength” deal with navigating relationships and life events. If you enjoy Ain’t That Lovin’, Swear and Shake are also offering their debut album Maple Ridge here on NoiseTrade as well.

When writer Will Hodge isn’t sounding his barbaric yawp over the rooftops of the world, you can find him running off at the keyboard about music, concerts, and vinyl at My So-Called Soundtrack

: Will’s Weekend Wrap-Up: The Dollyrots, Twin Forks, Foreknown, and Swear and Shake