Posts tagged ‘United States’

Mayer sees $640M BrightRoll buy as potentially transformative for Yahoo

November 13, 2014 5:23 am


Yahoo is continuing to invest big in its video future, paying $640 million for programmatic ad platform BrightRoll, a deal that has been rumored for weeks. The purchase...

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September 30, 2014 7:36 am


In early May, my Internet Middleman post described how a tiny number of very large broadband network operators, mostly in the United States, are using their market power to try to extract arbitrary access charges, and in so doing, are degrading the service they sold to their paying broadband customers. They achieve this degradation by…

The post “Not” Neutrality? appeared first on Beyond Bandwidth.

Programmatic Expands Deeper into Video, With TV Next

September 9, 2014 12:15 pm


Programmatic advertising has become widespread in display ads, and is poised to make deeper inroads into video and TV. Already, 84% of ad executives in the United States buy display ads using
programmatic buying, with about 58% doing so for video, and 60% buying in this fashion for mobile ads, according to a survey by AOL Platforms reported on by eMarketer.


August 5, 2014 4:06 pm


Who Stole the Four Hour Workday?

Alex is a busy man. The 36-year-old husband and father of three commutes each day to his full-time job at a large telecom company in Denver, the city he moved to from his native Peru in 2003. At night, he has classes or homework for the bachelor’s in social science he is pursuing at a nearby university. With or without an alarm, he wakes up at 5 AM every day, and it’s only then, after eating breakfast and glancing at the newspaper, that he has a chance to serve in his capacity as the sole US organizer and webmaster of the Global Campaign for the 4 Hour Work-Day.

“I’ve been trying to contact other organizations,” he says, “though, ironically, I don’t have time.”

But Alex has big plans. By the end of the decade he envisions “a really crazy movement” with chapters around the world orchestrating the requisite work stoppage.

A century ago, such an undertaking would have seemed less obviously doomed. For decades the US labor movement had already been filling the streets with hundreds of thousands of workers demanding an eight-hour workday. This was just one more step in the gradual reduction of working hours that was expected to continue forever. Before the Civil War, workers like the factory women of Lowell, Massachusetts, had fought for a reduction to ten hours from 12 or more. Later, when the Great Depression hit, unions called for shorter hours to spread out the reduced workload and prevent layoffs; big companies like Kellogg’s followed suit voluntarily. But in the wake of World War II, the eight-hour grind stuck, and today most workers end up doing more than that.

The United States now leads the pack of the wealthiest countries in annual working hours. US workers put in as many as 300 more hours a year than their counterparts in Western Europe, largely thanks to the lack of paid leave. (The Germans work far less than we do, while the Greeks work considerably more.) Average worker productivity has doubled a couple of times since 1950, but income has stagnated—unless you’re just looking at the rich, who’ve become a great deal richer. The value from that extra productivity, after all, has to go somewhere.

It used to be common sense that advances in technology would bring more leisure time. “If every man and woman would work for four hours each day on something useful,” Benjamin Franklin assumed, “that labor would produce sufficient to procure all the necessaries and comforts of life.” Science fiction has tended to consider a future with shorter hours to be all but an axiom. Edward Bellamy’s 1888 best seller Looking Backward describes a year 2000 in which people do their jobs for about four to eight hours, with less attractive tasks requiring less time. In the universe of Star Trek, work is done for personal development, not material necessity. In Wall-E, robots do everything, and humans have become inert blobs lying on levitating sofas.


HBO Streaming May Expand To Countries In Europe And Asia

August 4, 2014 2:08 pm


Despite increased interest in online video streaming services in the United States, HBO doesn’t have any immediate plans to offer its premium …